Amy Thompson

  • Endorsed Enrolled Nurse, Registered Nurse, Registered Midwife
  • First Dunghutti University trained Registered Nurse and Registered Midwife

“I wanted to make a change and be there for my people by being the advocate on their behalf”

Q1) Name: Amy Thompson

Q2) Current Role RN/RMpage1image700781968

Q3) How long have you been a nurse or midwife?

I have been a EEN for 15 years than went onto become a RN and have been a RN for 3 years now I have just recently finished my Midwifery studies to become a RM

Q4) Why did you want to become a nurse or midwife?

Because I was raised in an Aboriginal mission and grew up watching the social determinants and poor health outcomes and racism my people faced when trying to get their needs met in the healthcare sector of public health care. So I wanted to make a change and be there for my people by being the advocate on their behalf and try bridge that gap between healthcare professionals which could give my people a better health outcome while being a familiar face to them as well, which makes my mob feel much more culturally safe.

I see the need for an Aboriginal Midwife within my community because there has never been an Aboriginal midwife, so now I am very proud within myself to become the 1st Aboriginal Dunghutti university trained Registered Midwife and Registered Nurse.

Q5) What were the enablers and barriers for you to complete your degree?

I faced a lot of endured conflicting pain along the way of my midwifery training. I am a single Mother of two young children and I faced situations of being unkind, not feeling understood and like the colour of my skin got in the way at times. But I took this challenge on to make a change and make my voice of frustrations heard and now strategies around implementing proper cultural safety measurements are being closely viewed in conjunction with me.page1image700978176page1image700978464page1image700978752

Q6) What was your pathway into nursing or midwifery? How did you get to where you are today?

I was an EEN, I got credit for some subjects at university when studying my RN through Newcastle University. I became a RN than done a postgraduate year before being accepted to do a Midstart program for my Midwifery. I studied through CSU and I am now recently finished my studies for the RM and waiting to graduate.

Q7) Do you believe our nurses and midwives are role models for our community? If so, do you think it is a priority that we increase our workforce? Why?

I believe we are the backbone to the healthcare system that enables a better health outcome for our people when they are their most vulnerable stage in life during hospital stay. We understand them for who they are and most importantly their needs and wants when they are sick. We provide a sense of safety due to we have been raised with that understanding of kinship, due to coming from that grass root level when growing up. We need to go back to having that grass root structure which will enable us to lay that foundation before we can build our empire that will stand strong. We need to be on the ground addressing the needs of our people, connecting with them in community and allowing them to feel safe when we deliver our services.

Q8) Anything else you would like to add?

I would like to see the workforce increase with more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people being a part of it within our health care systems making strategic changes that will better our people’s health care especially the up and coming generation.

Acknowledgement of Country

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) acknowledges the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of this Nation.

We acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Lands on which our company is located and where we conduct our business. We pay our respects to Countries, Creator, Ancestors and Elders, past, present and future.

CATSINaM is committed to honouring Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples' unique cultural and spiritual relationships to the land, waters and seas and their rich contribution to society.

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